Archive for the ‘WordPress’ Category.

A while back, I wrote a post detailing why it was a bad idea to generate Javascripts using PHP in WordPress plugins. In that post, I mentioned a couple of better ways to do it.

At the time, I didn’t know about the third, and best way, to accomplish this. Mike’s comment over there reminded me of it. WordPress has it built in.

If you already know about wp_localize_script, you can stop reading now.

The wp_localize_script function was made in order to allow for WordPress translations to be able to also translate some of the JS files inside WordPress. Thus the name “localize”. The way it works is to load up the translated versions of text from the translation files and then include them into the resulting HTML output as a Javascript object. The scripts then use that object to produce any text output they need to produce.

Turns out that’s really similar to our goal of sending arbitrary parameters from WordPress to be used by Javascript code.

How to do it:

1. Make your script static (instead of generated) and enqueue your script as per normal. Example:

wp_enqueue_script('my-script','/path/to/whatever.js',…);

No real changes there. You’ll have to come back and modify your script to use these parameters it’s getting passed, but we’ll get to that in a minute.

2. Build an array of your parameters that you want to send to the script.

$params = array(
  'foo' => 'bar',
  'setting' => 123,
);

Note that my parameters are simple examples, but this is PHP code. You can get your parameters however you like. Such as get_option to pull them from the database, perhaps.

3. Call wp_localize_script and give your parameters a unique name.

wp_localize_script( 'my-script', 'MyScriptParams', $params );

What this will do is make WordPress output an inline script with your parameters (properly encoded) just before the enqueue outputs the script tag that loads your script in the first place. So then those parameters will be available to your script as an instance of an object with “MyScriptParams” (from my example).

This means that Javascript code can now reference them as attributes of the name you gave.

So, step 4. Modify your script to use those parameters. In my example, I used “MyScriptParams” and the parameter names are “foo” and “setting”. In my Javascript code I can use them as “MyScriptParams.foo” and “MyScriptParams.setting”.

Much cleaner. One static and unchanging JS file to cache. Parameters get put into your HTML itself as a one-liner. You can deal with the parameters using a normal PHP array before passing them over. No need to screw around with generating Javascript from PHP or looking for wp-load or even messing with tricky actions.

Perfect.

Shortlink:

While this isn’t affecting a lot of people now, it will be in the future. Especially if you use well-supported themes.

Somewhere in version 2.8 or 2.9, WordPress started supporting Theme Updates. In the same way that it supports automatic plugin updates from the plugin repository, a theme developer can now make updates to their theme in the themes repository, and you can upgrade it directly from the WordPress interface.

This is a great thing. Theme developers can fix problems, add features, and have it easy for the users to get those changes right away.

Unfortunately, the theme has historically been the user’s playground. Themes are frequently modified by the user directly. Whether it be for looks or for adding code to be used by plugins or whatever, the theme you’re using is very probably not the theme you downloaded. So upgrading will blow away your changes. Thus, most people are disinclined to upgrade their themes.

The way to avoid this is with a child theme. Child themes derive from another theme, called the parent theme. A child theme, by default, looks exactly like the parent. Then you make your changes to the child, and those changes are used on the site. The parent remains untouched. So, when you upgrade the parent theme, the changes you made don’t go anywhere. They stay right where they are.

So let’s dive right in:

How to Make a Child Theme

First, obviously, install the parent theme. Take note of what directory name it goes into. You can find this on the Theme’s screen, it will tell you what directory each theme is in. The new default theme in 3.0 is “twentyten”. So let’s use that one as our parent.

Now, create a new directory in your /wp-content/themes directory. This is where we’ll put our child theme. Let’s call it “mytheme”.

In the mytheme directory, create a new style.css file. Put this in it:

/*
Theme Name: My Theme
Template: twentyten
*/
@import url('../twentyten/style.css');

Finally, load up WordPress and go activate your new “My Theme” theme. You’ll notice that WordPress tells you both what directory your child theme is in and what directory its parent is located in.

Now you’re running on a child theme. It doesn’t have any changes in it, so it looks exactly like the twentyten theme does, but still, we’re running it.

How to Change Things

Let’s say I wanted to change the color of the post titles to, say, green. A silly change, but it illustrates the point.

Normally, I’d go edit the theme, find wherever the color of the text is defined, and change it or add to it to make the titles change in the way I want. In this case, I do the same thing, but I modify the child theme, and I do it in a way that overrides the specificity of the parent’s CSS code.

To do this, I add this code to mytheme’s style.css file:

#content h2.entry-title a {
   color: green;
}

Why that change? Well, I looked at the parent theme and found that “#content .entry-title a” was what it used to define the color of the post title links. To override that, I need to be more specific.

Specificity is a difficult concept for some people, but basically it breaks down to this: When the browser is parsing the CSS, more specific rules take precedence over less specific rules.

In my case I needed to be more specific than “#content .entry-title a“. By adding the h2 to the .entry-title rule, I achieve that because h2.entry-title only will affect h2’s with the entry-title class, while just .entry-title can affect any tag on the page with that class.

The fact that only the h2’s on my page have .entry-title is irrelevant. The HTML doesn’t actually matter in regards to specificity. A rule is more specific based on what it can affect, not on what it actually affects.

So by making my rule more specific, I can override the color of those title’s in my own CSS file separately, and without changing anything about the parent theme.

Overriding Templates

Child themes are not limited to overriding only styling, although in many cases that may be the only customization you need. Best to stick with the rule of the minimum; try to make the most minimal change you can make to accomplish what you want to accomplish. But if you do want to change the way some of the templates work, you can do that too.

All you have to do is to copy the specific template file you want to alter from the parent theme into the child theme’s directory, then make your changes. The way WordPress works is when it looks for some template file, it looks in the child theme first, then it goes to the parent theme if the file it wants isn’t there.

Note that you’re not limited to overriding existing files in the parent. The entire Template Hierarchy applies to child themes too, so if you want to define a category.php file for Category Templates, and the parent theme doesn’t have that file, then you can create a new one in your child and it will be used. You will probably still want to start out with some existing template from the parent though, so look at the Template Hierarchy to see which template the parent is using for your case. The index.php is the usual suspect in these cases, so you can probably just copy that to the child theme and rename it to the template file you want it to be.

Overriding Functions

One exception to the overriding mechanism of child themes has to do with the functions.php file. In a child theme situation, both functions.php files from both themes are loaded. This is necessary because elements of your parent theme might require pieces of the functions.php file to be loaded. This can make overriding functions in the parent theme tricky unless it’s written to allow you to do just that.

The key to this is that the functions.php file of the child theme is loaded first. So if the parent theme is written in a manner WordPress calls “pluggable“, then you can override those functions.

In the twentyten theme’s functions.php file, several of the functions are defined like this:

if ( ! function_exists( 'twentyten_admin_header_style' ) ) :
function twentyten_admin_header_style() {
...
}
endif;

That is a pluggable function. Basically, before it defines the function, it checks to see if the function is already defined. If the parent theme uses this mechanism, then a child theme can override this function by simply defining a function of the same name first. So all you have to do to change it is to copy the function into your child’s functions.php file and make your changes. When the parent theme loads, it will see that you already defined the function and continue on.

Another way to override things is through the normal WordPress action and filter hook mechanisms. If a theme’s functions.php file uses those, then you can simply add your own hooked functions with different names. However, because the child’s functions.php file loads first, it can’t actually unhook things defined by the parent theme.

The way to get around this is to use the after_setup_theme action hook. This action is called immediately after both functions.php files are loaded.

For example, if I look at the twentyten theme, I’ll find this:

function twentyten_excerpt_length( $length ) {
	return 40;
}
add_filter( 'excerpt_length', 'twentyten_excerpt_length' );

I don’t want that, I want my excerpts to be 55 words instead. So I add this to my functions.php file:

function my_excerpt_length( $length ) {
	return 55;
}
add_filter( 'excerpt_length', 'my_excerpt_length' );

Whoops! It doesn’t work. Why not? Because I didn’t remove twentyten’s hook, and its filter is overriding mine. So I have to add this too:

function my_undo_hooks( $length ) {
	remove_filter( 'excerpt_length', 'twentyten_excerpt_length' );
}
add_action( 'after_setup_theme', 'my_undo_hooks' );

And then it works. I’ve added my filter, and removed the one in twentyten. Voila.

Programmer Note

In a WordPress theme you’ll often find references to “stylesheet_uri” and “stylesheet_dir”. You’ll also find references to “template_uri” and “template_dir”. Normally, these are the same thing. In a child theme case, they’re not. Stylesheet refers to the child theme. Template refers to the parent theme. This is an important distinction that you’ll want to make when creating your theme. You should probably use stylesheet in most cases, except for when you need to specifically refer to the parent (for image URL creation and such).

Conclusion

Child themes are a very good way to survive theme upgrades, and if you’re using a well supported theme, these are likely to become more common. It’s still perfectly safe to modify your theme directly (except for twentyten! Normal WP upgrades overwrite twentyten), but it’s always a good idea to keep your customizations separate. They’re a lot easier to manage that way.

Shortlink:

One of the things that changes in WP 3.0 with multi-site is where file uploads and attachments get stored. This can be confusing to people trying to do export/imports and combine sites together.

In the .htaccess file of a multisite installation, you’ll find this little bit of code:

# uploaded files
RewriteRule ^([_0-9a-zA-Z-]+/)?files/(.+) wp-includes/ms-files.php?file=$2 [L]

The effect of this code is to redirect requests that have “files” in the name to the ms-files.php. As you may have guessed, ms-files.php is the multi-site file handler.

Files in multi-site mode are stored in the /wp-content/blogs.dir structure. Inside that directory, you will find subdirectories labeled with numbers (1, 2, 3, etc.).  Each number corresponds to the ID number of the individual site in the multi-site installation. Each one of these directories holds all the uploaded files for that installation. The ms-files.php file handles a bunch of caching parameters and then sends the file off to the browser upon request.

So the resulting URLs always look like http://example.com/files/2010/whatever.jpg and so forth. The “files” name is therefore special and reserved and cannot be used as a post slug and such.

When you export a site from somewhere and then import it into your new multi-site system, if you also choose to import the attachments, then you’ll have a minor problem. The attachments will be imported into this new files structure. However, the links from an older system are still referring to the old /wp-content/uploads/ directory structure that non-multi-site installs use. Therefore, you will need to go back through your posts and fix all these links and references to the attachments. I use the Search Regex plugin for this purpose, it works well enough and has some powerful search and replace capabilities.

Shortlink:

I am making a theme today and working on the image attachment templates. I found that I needed the next and previous image links (in the single image templates… image.php) to be of a specific size, regardless of what the settings the admin tool were. Specifically, I want them to always be 100×100 pixels in size, and cropped.

Image sizing is always a problem for themes. Theme designers want their theme to be pixel perfect in all cases, but WordPress wants the user to have some form of control. With image sizes, WordPress lets the user pick the size of their image thumbnails and so forth. In that case, using those becomes problematic for certain places in the theme which need pre-defined image sizes.

Here’s the quick and easy solution: add_image_size. This function lets you create custom image sizes that can be used by your theme. Plugins can do the same sort of things, of course, but this really comes in more useful as a theme developer’s tool.

In my functions.php file, I put this code:

add_image_size( 'themename-nav-thumbnail', 100, 100, true );

That creates a new image size for WordPress. When image files get uploaded, that new image size will be magically created along with all the other sizes. In this case, it’ll be 100 by 100 pixels, and cropped exactly to that (that’s what the “true” means).

Note the use of the “themename” prefix? You can use anything you like here, actually, but it’s a good habit to always use prefixes for custom identifiers you ever make. This prevents things from interfering with each other.

Anyway, to then use that size for my navigational thumbnails, this small bit of code works:

<div class="prev-img">
<?php echo previous_image_link('themename-nav-thumbnail'); ?>
</div>
<div class="next-img">
<?php echo next_image_link('themename-nav-thumbnail'); ?>
</div>

I wrapped them in DIVs so that I can float them left and right and style them and such.

So custom image sizes are easy enough to do, but it’s a trick I didn’t know about until I needed it just now. Thought somebody else should know about it too.

Shortlink:

The other day, Klint Finley wrote a very good walkthrough of using the new Multisite functionality of WordPress 3.0. In the comments, a lot of people wanted to know how to use your own domain names. Since I’m doing that now, here’s a quick walkthrough/how-to guide.

Step 1: Manual Plugin Installation

The Domain Mapping plugin is not your regular kind of plugin. You cannot install it through the normal Plugins->Add New menu. Well, actually, you can, it just won’t work.

So first, download the plugin manually.

Note: For this tutorial, I will be using the WordPress MU Domain Mapping plugin. However, I am using the trunk version of the plugin. It has fixes in it that you will need for proper 3.0 support. Don’t try it with the regular version. (Note: The regular version works fine. This was originally written before the latest version, or 3.0, was released.)

The plugin has two main files you need to put in the proper places.

Domain mapping php file location

The first file is the domain_mapping.php file. This needs to go into the mu-plugins folder. The mu-plugins folder is a special folder, which you may not even have yet. Just create it underneath the wp-content folder and put that file into it.

Sunrise php file location

The second file is the sunrise.php file. This is a special filename for WordPress. Don’t worry about it, just put it in the wp-content folder.

Step 2: Activate Sunrise

Now you need to edit your wp-config.php file. Add this line of code to it:

define( 'SUNRISE', 'on' );

Simple, really. This will cause WordPress to go load that sunrise.php file and use it.

Step 3: Server info

Now you have to configure the domain mapping plugin so that it knows what it’s doing properly. This is easy to do, really. Go to your main domain’s admin page and log in as a super admin. Then go to the new Super Admin->Domain Mapping menu.

Domain mapping setup screen

Here you have a few different options, but two main ones that count. You can either put in the IP address of your server (as defined in your domain’s main A record) or you can put in a CNAME that points to your server. The IP address is what most people will want to use. If your server uses more than one, you can enter them all here, separated by commas.

Other options on this page:

  • Remote Login – This will make your login pages for all sites redirect to your main site to do the actual login. The benefit of this is that when you log in to one, you log into all of them. The downside is that the URL changes to another domain in order to log in.
  • Permanent redirect (better for your blogger’s pagerank) – This makes your subdomain or subdirectory sites redirect to their domains. You should leave this on.
  • User domain mapping page – Turn this on if you want users to be able to put in their own domains for mapping.
  • Redirect administration pages to blog’s original domain (remote login disabled if redirect disabled) – This makes all admin pages show up on the original domain instead of on the new domains. You need this enabled for remote login to work.

Generally I leave only the middle two on. Remote-login is iffy at best, and I want my new domain name to show up everywhere.

Step 4: Mapping the Domain

There’s a bit of a prerequisite here before you do this. When you buy a new domain, you will need to edit its DNS settings to actually point to your server IP or CNAME or whatever you do to make the domain connect to your server. For me, I just give it a new A record with my server IP in it. Easy.

Update: Okay, so there may be more to it than just that, depending on your host. Every host is different, and you’ll have to talk to your host to make them able to point the domain name at your existing site. How to do this varies from host to host, but the important thing is that when you visit your new domain (before you do this!) then you want it to go to your main site, as is.

There’s two ways you can actually map a domain to one of your sites. The user screen is the simplest way, if you left that option on before. Log into the site you actually want to map to a new domain, then go to Tools->Domain Mapping.

User Domain Mapping Screen

All you really do is put in a new domain and set it as the primary. Simple.

Note that if you didn’t get the domain pointed at your server before doing this, then your site will instantly vanish from the realm of mortal man. Setting the primary domain takes effect instantly. You won’t be able to access the site through the old domain any more.

The other way to set domain mapping is through the Super Admin->Domains menu. Here you’ll find a list of sites and their ID numbers. You can map an id number directly to a domain name here. The Tools approach is a bit easier to use, but this will allow you to map domains without visiting them, as you can access this list from your main domain. You can also correct broken domain mappings from here.

Step 5: Seeing the Mapped Domains

If you go to Super Admin->Sites, you’ll find this type of a listing:

Sites listing

You’ll note that on the right hand side you can see the column showing the mapped domains.

Special Note: See in the picture how I’m using a subdirectory install? That’s relatively new. In older versions of the domain mapping system, you had to use a subdomain installation and wildcard DNS for domain mapping to work. This is no longer the case, domain mapping works just fine with subdirectories.

Conclusion

And that’s how it’s done. It’s not super complex, but it does require some knowledge of DNS and how servers work. If you can successfully set up a multi-site install to begin with, you can probably do this as well. Just be aware that it is slightly finicky, and know that you will break your site if you put in the wrong settings somewhere. However, your main domain will always be accessible as long as you don’t try to map it, so you’ll be able to go in from there to correct your mistakes.

Shortlink:

There’s been a lot of talk about custom post types, and I know many people are looking forward to it. Unfortunately, I think some (perhaps many) of those people are going to be disappointed. Custom Post Types might not be what you think they are.

I blame the naming, really. “Custom Post Types” makes the implication that these are “Posts”. They’re not. “Post Type” is really referring to the internal structure of WordPress. See, all the main content in WordPress is stored in a table called “wp_posts”. It has a post_type column, and until now, that column has had two main values in it: “post” and “page”. And there’s the big secret:

“Custom Post Types” are really Pages.

Sorta.

For a long time in the early days of WordPress, it just had Posts. But hey, no big deal, because it was just running a big Blog anyway, right? The Posts appeared on the Blog page (and in the Feed) in reverse chronological order. Each Post could appear on its own URL, using the Permalink structure.

Pages came along and changed that.

  • Pages don’t appear on the Blog. Or in the Feed.
  • Pages don’t even really have dates and times on them that usually get displayed.
  • Pages have their own URL at the root of the website, outside the Permalink rules.
  • Pages even have hierarchy in their URLs, if they want.

Pages, however, do live in the wp_posts table. So post_type exists to handle that. When WordPress is building the Blog, it looks for post_type = “post”.

Bring on the “Custom”.

Now we have these Custom Post Types. Or rather, custom post_types. Instead of “page” or “post”, we can have “custom”. Or “fred”. Whatever we like.

But how do these new post types get displayed? What do their URLs look like?

Well, these are custom, and they can be customized. You can give them their own space on the website. So if I want them to live at /custom/page-name, then I can. If I want them to have hierarchy, then I can do so. Justin Tadlock explains how they can be made to do this quite well.

But they are still not Posts.
They do not show up on the Blog.
They do not appear in the Feed.

This is a matter of definitions, really. See, the Blog is a reverse chronological order of the Posts. That it what it is defined to be. The Feed is basically the same thing, in feed form.

So all of you thinking of a custom “Podcast” post type, you’re in for a disappointment.

So what’s the big deal?

Well, all that said, custom types can have their own systems of doing things. They are custom, and as such, they are customizable.

If, for example, you wanted to have them appear on their own “blog” area, or in their own “feed”, then sure, that’s entirely doable. You can make a function to produce your custom feed. You can then call “add_feed” to add your feed. You can create single-type.php templates in your theme that will be used for your custom type. You could even make a “blog” out of your custom type.

And doing it the other way is possible too. You can adjust the “Blog” to show your type. You could change the “Feed” to show your type as well.

But these things are NOT the default way of doing things. There’s no code in there to do that, and there’s very likely not going to be. If you want your type in the Blog, in the Feed, then you have to do it yourself. The URL is NOT easy to customize and play around with. The rewrite system is unforgiving, and you have to stick within a set of rules for things to work well.

However, should you? Let’s say you make a “Podcast” custom type. You can go to the effort of putting them in the feeds and making them show special on the blog… but you could already do that with a “podcast” category. And it’s much easier to do a category and customize categories than custom types will ever be.

Something like 80% of the uses I’ve seen for “custom types” would be better served by making normal posts and using some existing method to separate them or to otherwise mark them as special.

So what are they good for?

What if you could install a forum on your site? bbPress is pretty good. But it could get all complicated to set up and such. Well, plugins are pretty easy. But all those forum posts have to go somewhere…

Custom Post Types is a way for plugins to define types of content for themselves.

A bbPress forum could store every post in the forum as its own custom post type quite easily.Or a wiki plugin could store each of its own pages as a custom post type. Things like that.

See, they’d get their own URL handling automatically, and they wouldn’t need weird database handling tricks.. It makes things much simpler and easier for those plugins to do their thing when they have the backend support for it in the core.

Some of you are thinking “Okay, so plugin authors can make better use of them. I won’t have to write a lick of code, I’ll just install a plugin that makes my type and handles the stuff for me.” And yeah, you can do that.

But then you’re wedded to that plugin. WordPress doesn’t know about your custom posts. If you remove the plugin, your custom posts are still there, but now they’re completely invisible. Can’t be pulled up, seen in the admin, the URLs all stop working…

Wrap it up, son…

Using custom post types right now is, for most people, a bad idea. Only specialized usages really exist for them… for now.

For the long term, WordPress will probably use them a lot more extensively. And plugins can make great use of them for all sorts of things. But you, as a user, probably don’t need to be messing with them. Not if you’re just creating a website or writing a blog. Not right now. Wait for the plugin and core development to catch up to the potential. Using them early leaves you open for a world of confusion and grief.

Shortlink:

WordPress 3.0 has something very handy that I want theme authors to start implementing as soon as possible.

To show exactly why it’s so useful, I modified my own theme to start using it.

Demonstration

So, here’s a big hunk of code I pulled out of my current theme’s comments.php. This hunk of code has only one purpose: To display the form area where people can leave a comment:

<?php if ('open' == $post->comment_status) : ?>

<div id="respond">

<h3><?php comment_form_title( 'Leave a Reply', 'Leave a Reply to %s' ); ?></h3>

<div class="cancel-comment-reply">
	<small><?php cancel_comment_reply_link(); ?></small>
</div>

<?php if ( get_option('comment_registration') && !$user_ID ) : ?>
<p>You must be <a href="<?php echo get_option('siteurl'); ?>/wp-login.php?redirect_to=<?php echo urlencode(get_permalink()); ?>">logged in</a> to post a comment.</p>
<?php else : ?>

<form action="<?php echo get_option('siteurl'); ?>/wp-comments-post.php" method="post" id="commentform">

<?php if ( $user_ID ) : ?>

<p>Logged in as <a href="<?php echo get_option('siteurl'); ?>/wp-admin/profile.php"><?php echo $user_identity; ?></a>. <a href="<?php echo wp_logout_url(get_permalink()); ?>" title="Log out of this account">Log out &raquo;</a></p>

<?php else : ?>

<p><input type="text" name="author" id="author" value="<?php echo $comment_author; ?>" size="22" tabindex="1" />
<label for="author"><small>Name <?php if ($req) echo "(required)"; ?></small></label></p>

<p><input type="text" name="email" id="email" value="<?php echo $comment_author_email; ?>" size="22" tabindex="2" />
<label for="email"><small>Mail (will not be published) <?php if ($req) echo "(required)"; ?></small></label></p>

<p><input type="text" name="url" id="url" value="<?php echo $comment_author_url; ?>" size="22" tabindex="3" />
<label for="url"><small>Website</small></label></p>

<?php endif; ?>

<!--<p><small><strong>XHTML:</strong> You can use these tags: <code><?php echo allowed_tags(); ?></code></small></p>-->

<p><textarea name="comment" id="comment" cols="100%" rows="10" tabindex="4"></textarea></p>

<p><input name="submit" type="submit" id="submit" tabindex="5" value="Submit Comment" />
<?php comment_id_fields(); ?>
</p>
<?php do_action('comment_form', $post->ID); ?>

</form>

<?php endif; // If registration required and not logged in ?>
</div>
<?php endif; // if you delete this the sky will fall on your head ?>

Nasty, eh? It’s a mess of if/else statements. It handles cases where the user is logged in or not, where the comments are open or closed, whether registration is required, etc. It’s confusing, difficult to modify, poor for CSS referencing…

Here’s what I replaced all that code with:

<?php comment_form(); ?>

Now then, that’s much better, isn’t it?

The comment_form function is new to 3.0. Basically, it standardizes the comments form. It makes it wonderful for us plugin authors, since now we can easily modify the comments form with various hooks and things. I’ve already modified Simple Facebook Connect and Simple Twitter Connect to support this new approach; if you’re using a theme with this, then the user won’t have to modify it to have their buttons appear on the comments form.

Customizing

Since theme authors love to customize things, the comments form is also extremely customizable. Doing it, however, can be slightly confusing.

Inside the comments_form function, we find some useful hooks to let us change things around.

The first hook is comment_form_default_fields. This lets us modify the three main fields: author, email, and website. It’s a filter, so we can change things as they pass through it. The fields are stored in an array which contains the html that is output. So it looks sorta like this:

array(
	'author' => '<p class="comment-form-author">...',
	'email'  => '<p class="comment-form-email">...',
	'url'    => '<p class="comment-form-url">...'
);

I truncated it for simplicity. But what this means is that code like this can modify the fields:

function my_fields($fields) {
$fields['new'] = '<p>Some new input field here</p>';
return $fields;
}
add_filter('comment_form_default_fields','my_fields');

That sort of thing lets us add a new input field, or modify the existing ones, etc…

But fields aren’t the only thing we can change. There’s a comment_form_defaults filter too. It gets a lot of the surrounding text of the comments form. The defaults look sorta like this:

$defaults = array(
	'fields'               => apply_filters( 'comment_form_default_fields', $fields ),
	'comment_field'        => '<p class="comment-form-comment">...',
	'must_log_in'          => '<p class="must-log-in">...',
	'logged_in_as'         => '<p class="logged-in-as">...',
	'comment_notes_before' => '<p class="comment-notes">...',
	'comment_notes_after'  => '<dl class="form-allowed-tags">...',
	'id_form'              => 'commentform',
	'id_submit'            => 'submit',
	'title_reply'          => __( 'Leave a Reply' ),
	'title_reply_to'       => __( 'Leave a Reply to %s' ),
	'cancel_reply_link'    => __( 'Cancel reply' ),
	'label_submit'         => __( 'Post Comment' ),
);

All the various pieces of html that are displayed as part of the comment form section are defined here. So those can be modified as you see fit. However, unlike the fields, adding new bits here won’t help us at all. The fields get looped through for displaying them, these are just settings that get used at various times.

But filters are not the only way to modify these. The comment_form function actually can take an array of arguments as the first parameter, and those arguments will modify the form. So if we wanted a simple change, like to change the wording of “Leave a Reply”, then we could do this:

<?php comment_form(array('title_reply'=>'Leave a Reply, Stupid')); ?>

This gives us a simple and easy way to make changes without all the trouble of filters. Nevertheless, those filters can be very useful for more complex operations.

But wait, there’s more!

As the comments form is being created, there’s a ton of action hooks being called, at every stage. So if you want to insert something into the form itself, there’s easy ways to do it.

A quick list of the action hooks. Most of them are self-explanatory.

  • comment_form_before
  • comment_form_must_log_in_after
  • comment_form_top
  • comment_form_logged_in_after
  • comment_notes_before
  • comment_form_before_fields
  • comment_form_field_{$name} (a filter on each and every field, where {$name} is the key name of the field in the array)
  • comment_form_after_fields
  • comment_form_field_comment (a filter on the “comment_field” default setting, which contains the textarea for the comment)
  • comment_form (action hook after the textarea, for backward compatibility mainly)
  • comment_form_after
  • comment_form_comments_closed

CSS and other extras

Let’s not forget styling. All parts of the comments form have nice classes and id’s and such. Take a look at the resulting HTML source and you’ll find all the styling capabilities you like. Also, everything is properly semantic, using label tags and aria-required and so forth. All the text is run through the translation system for core translations.

So theme authors should start modifying their themes to use this instead of the existing big-ugly-comment-form code. Your users will thank you for it. Plugin authors will thank you for it. And really, it’s about time we made WordPress themes more about design and less about the nuts and bolts of the programming, no?

Shortlink:

Took a look at @anywhere a little while ago. With my experience working with the Facebook javascript methods, it was rather trivial to incorporate the new javascript functionality from Twitter into Simple Twitter Connect, so that was exactly what I did.

Simple Twitter Connect 0.7 now automatically enables your site to run the new @anywhere code. With zero extra configuration steps.

All the example javascript code they give on the @anywhere documentation site will work immediately.

I even added an example plugin (STC-Linkify) to demonstrate how it works. Activate that plugin and it will automatically link any Twitter usernames on your page to Twitter. So when I type @ottodestruct or @otto42, they’re automatically linked. Neat, eh?

I’ll be adding several more @anywhere plugins to the package soon, but those will be in the next update. If you want them in advance, then you can see the trunk version of the plugin and pick and choose which you want. I’ve already added the Follow Button widget to there, so you can go get it now if you like. I’m already using it here in my sidebar. :)

Shortlink:


I’m working on a Simple Google Connect for the future. But for now, here’s a simple Buzz Button using the functionality they announced today.

sgc-buzz.php

<?php
/*
Plugin Name: SGC - Buzz Button  
Plugin URI: http://ottopress.com/wordpress-plugins/simple-google-connect
Description: Adds a Google Buzz button to your content.
Author: Otto
Version: 0.1
Author URI: http://ottodestruct.com
License: GPL2

    Copyright 2010  Samuel Wood  (email : otto@ottodestruct.com)

    This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
    it under the terms of the GNU General Public License version 2, 
    as published by the Free Software Foundation. 
    
    You may NOT assume that you can use any other version of the GPL.

    This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
    but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
    MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
    GNU General Public License for more details.
    
    The license for this software can likely be found here: 
    http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-2.0.html
    
*/

wp_enqueue_script( 'google-buzz-button', 'http://www.google.com/buzz/api/button.js', array(), '1', true );

/**
 * Simple GB button
 *
 * @param int $post_id An optional post ID.
 */
function get_buzz_button($id = 0) {
	$url = get_permalink($id);
	$out = '<a title="Post on Google Buzz" class="google-buzz-button" href="http://www.google.com/buzz/post" data-button-style="normal-count" data-url="';
	$out .= $url;
	$out .= '"></a>';
	return $out;
}

function buzz_button($source = '', $id = 0) {
	echo get_buzz_button($id);
}

/**
 * Simple buzz button as a shortcode
 *
 * Example use: buzz id="123"
 */
function buzz_button_shortcode($atts) {
	extract(shortcode_atts(array(
		'id' => 0,
	), $atts));
	return get_buzz_button($id);
}

add_shortcode('buzz', 'buzz_button_shortcode');

function buzz_button_automatic($content) {
	$button = get_buzz_button();
	$content = $content . $button;
	return $content;
}
add_filter('the_content', 'buzz_button_automatic', 30);
Shortlink:

The Custom Background screen

The Custom Background screen is easy to add to any theme

Quick and simple way to add the new custom background selector to your WordPress 3.0 theme.

add_custom_background();

Seriously. That’s it. Just add that to the theme’s functions.php file.

Details

Okay, so your theme does need to have the normal wp_head() call in it. For those of you more CSS inclined, this basically creates CSS code for the body and adds that code to the head output directly. Voila, your theme gets styled.

Note that you will need to also not define your own background stuff in the theme for this to work. If the user tries to put in a solid color background and you define an image background, then the color won’t work or be visible over your image. Best to not put anything background related onto the body at all, in fact.

Customization

For those more inclined to customize things, there’s actually three parameters you can use:

function add_custom_background($header_callback = '', $admin_header_callback = '', $admin_image_div_callback = '')

Each of these are references to a callback function. If you use them, then you need to define your own callback functions to replace the default ones.

The header_callback function is what builds and outputs the CSS. The function takes no parameters, but it can use get_background_image() and get_background_color() to retrieve the necessary information. From this information, the function should produce and output (echo) the necessary <style> block to show the image.

The admin_header_callback function is called in the head section of the admin side of things; in the Background section to be specific. The admin_image_div_callback is similar, called immediately after displaying “This is your current background” on that page, where the image is displayed. If used, the admin_image_div_callback replaces the display of the current background image, so you custom callback should produce that instead.

These two admin callbacks can be used to modify the Background admin page, to add custom text or information, etc.

But generally, most themes won’t need this level of customization. Just add the basic code to the theme and the defaults are good to go. :)

Shortlink: